Henry James Cumberpatch Medals

Henry James Cumberpatch's WW1 Medals - 1914-15 Star, British War Medal and Victory Medal.

Henry James Cumberpatch was born in 1876 in Dallington, Northampton, England. He was the son of John Cumberpatch and his wife Elizabeth nee Hayman. In 1897 he married Mary Ann Adams in Northampton.

Henry James CUMBERPATCH (1876-1953)

Henry James CUMBERPATCH, son of John CUMBERPATCH (1843-1927) and Elizabeth HAYMAN (aft1850-1896), was born Q3 1876 in Dallington, Northamptonshire, England.  On 3 April 1881 he was resident in Duston, Northamptonshire, England aged 4.  The address was: Devonshire Street.  On 5 April 1891 he was resident in Duston aged 14.  The address was: 50 St James Road.  On 5 April 1891 he was a Currier's Apprentice in Duston.  

Henry married Mary Ann ADAMS [1547] Q2 1897 in Northampton Registration District, Northamptonshire, England.  She and Henry James CUMBERPATCH had the following children:

  • Florence Annie CUMBERPATCH (1897?- ): Florence was born in 1897 (calculated) in Northampton. On 31 March 1901 she was resident in Dallington aged 4. The address was: 6 St James Square. She was baptised on 15 September 1903 in Dallington. The address was: St James' Church. On 2 April 1911 she was resident in Northampton aged 14. The address was: 13 Doddridge Street. On 2 April 1911 she was a Shoe Fitter in Northampton. Whether Employer, Worker, or Working on Own Account: Worker.
  • John Henry CUMBERPATCH (1898-1914): John was born Q1 1898 in Northampton. On 31 March 1901 he was resident in Dallington aged 3. The address was: 6 St James Square. He was baptised on 15 September 1903 in Dallington. The address was: St James Church. On 2 April 1911 he was resident in Northampton aged 13. The address was: 13 Doddridge Street. On 2 April 1911 he was a Shoe Finisher in Northampton. Whether Employer, Worker, or Working on Own Account: Worker. On 22 October 1914 John was a Private "H" Company, 1st Battalion Cameronians (Scottish Rifles) Regimental Number 19023. He died on 22 October 1914 in La Boutillerie in France aged 16. He was buried in Ploegsteert Memorial, Comines-Warneton, Hainaut, Belgium.
  • William Edward CUMBERPATCH (1899-1901): William was born Q3 1899 in Northampton Registration District. On 31 March 1901 he was resident in Dallington aged 2. The address was: 6 St James Square. He died Q2 1901 in Northampton Registration District aged 1.
  • Susannah CUMBERPATCH (1900- ): Susannah was born in October 1900 in Northampton. On 31 March 1901 she was resident in Dallington aged 5 months. The address was: 6 St James Square. She was baptised on 15 September 1903 in Dallington. The address was: St James' Church. On 2 April 1911 she was resident in Northampton aged 10. The address was: 13 Doddridge Street. On 2 April 1911 she was a School in Northampton.
  • Harry CUMBERPATCH (1902?- ): Harry was born in 1902 (calculated) in Northampton. He was baptised on 15 September 1903 in Dallington. The address was: St James' Church. On 2 April 1911 he was resident in Northampton aged 8. The address was: 13 Doddridge Street.
  • Elizabeth H CUMBERPATCH (1903- ): Elizabeth was born Q3 1903 in Northampton. She was baptised on 15 September 1903 in Dallington. The address was: St James' Church. On 2 April 1911 she was resident in Northampton aged 7. The address was: 13 Doddridge Street.
  • Edith May CUMBERPATCH (1909- ): Edith was born Q3 1909 in Northampton. On 2 April 1911 she was resident in Northampton aged 1. The address was: 13 Doddridge Street.
  • Son CUMBERPATCH (1911?- ): Son was born on 24 March 1911 (calculated) in Northampton. On 2 April 1911 he was resident in Northampton aged 9 days. The address was: 13 Doddridge Street.
  • Charles Edward CUMBERPATCH (1917- ): Charles was born Q3 1917 in Northampton Registration District. He married Olive Mary HUTCHINS [9505] Q1 1948 in Northampton Registration District.  He died Q4 1978 in Northampton Registration District.

Between 9 November 1914 and 2 March 1916 he was a Private 16299 Northamptonshire Regiment.  On 16 June 1916 he was a Private 16299 Northamptonshire Regiment in France.  Henry joined to avenge the death of his son:

Local Heroes who have Fallen.

News has been received of the death of Pte. J. Cumberpatch, of "H" Co. of the Cameronians, who was killed in action on Oct. 22nd [1914]. He was formerly employed by Messrs. C. and E. Lewis, where he was very popular among his fellow workmen. His father Pte. Henry James Cumberpatch, of 13, Doddridge St., has joined Kitchener's Army, and hopes to go to the front to revenge the death of his son.

The Northampton Independent Vol. 10, No. 482 Saturday, November, 21st, 1914 p.9

Medal Rolls

NORTHAMPTONSHIRE REGIMENT
ROLL OF INDIVIDUALS entitled to the Decoration granted under Army Order 20 of 1919

B.191

Regtl. No.

Rank

Name

Date of Disembarkation

Remarks

16299

Private

Cumberpatch H.J. [Henry James]

16 Jun 1915 (1) [France]

Discharged 27 Mar 1916

3/10453

Private

Cumberpatch W. [William]

11 Jan 1915 (1) [France]

Discharged 21 May 1916

NORTHAMPTONSHIRE REGIMENT
ROLL OF INDIVIDUALS entitled to the Victory Medal and British War Medal granter under Army Orders 266 of 1919 and 301 of 1919

B.238

Regtl. No.

Rank

Name

Unit

Remarks

16299

Private

Cumberpatch Henry James

16299 Private Northants 1st

Discharged 27 Mar 1916

3/10453

Private

Cumberpatch William

3/10453 Private Northants 1st

Discharged 21 May 1916

 

Foreign News: Dark Tide

Monday, Aug. 18, 1947

In Britain, for centuries a bastion of tolerance and hospitable haven for Jews, * anti-Semitism had bloated to disturbing dimensions. Partly it was caused by events in Palestine. But, as before in Europe and in history, Jews were also being made the scapegoats for economic hardships. With increasing frequency, ordinary Britons coupled "spivs" with Jews.

Outbreaks of anti-Semitism were in the news. A Northampton magistrate heard it said that Henry James Cumberpatch, a cinema doorman, "affected by the news from Palestine, took a revolver and went out into the street-quite wrongheadedly -to wreak vengeance upon some innocent Jew." Cumberpatch was charged with using the weapon as a club to beat one Dan Cipin, tailor and Jew.

Ugliest Aspect. At Eccles, in Lancashire, one Jack Piggott drew six months' imprisonment for smashing a Jewish-owned shop window and leading a crowd of 700, some of whom shouted what few Britons had ever been expected to shout: "Hitler was right." At Holyhead, a laborer was fined for smashing the windows of two Jewish shops. In London, two women arrested for pitching bricks through Oxford Street windows said: "We did it because the owner is a Jew." In Wales, signs appeared on a school wall reading: "Jewish murderers" and "Hitler was right." At Kingstanding, near Birmingham, hooligans stole into a Jewish cemetery, uprooted gravestones, defaced them with signs: "Hang the Jews," "Dirty Jews," "Pig," "Swine." There were other outbreaks in Cardiff, Devonport, Liverpool.

The old observation that racialism follows race concentrations did not apply. London, with two-thirds of all Britain's 385,000 Jews, had a relatively mild anti-Semitic seizure. Leeds, with the highest proportionate concentration of Jews among British cities, heard some muttering but saw no violence. Liverpool, with a small, old, well-integrated Jewish group, had four nights of window smashing, synagogue burning and looting to a refrain of anti-Jewish slogans. There, at least 100 shop windows were broken, mostly by adolescents; sometimes crowds as large as 2,000 looked on, did nothing except to give an occasional cheer. This passive approval, to the horrified Manchester Guardian, "was the ugliest aspect."

Responsibility. Most newspapers reacted with disapproval that ranged from tepid to thunderous. But the weekly Morecambe (Lancashire) Visitor (circ. 17,500) summoned its readers to "rejoice greatly [over] the pleasant fact that only a handful of Jews bespoil the population of our borough! . . . Violence may be the only way to bring [Jews] to a sense of their responsibility to the country in which they live."

Three days before, a quiet group of men had quietly laid a wreath at Whitehall's Cenotaph, Britain's monument to valorous Britons. It was inscribed:' "In memory of Sergeant Martin and Sergeant Paice, who died doing their duty in Palestine, July 30, 1947. From their Jewish ex-service comrades of the British forces." And it was signed with many names. Among them: Major Sir Jack Benn Brunei Cohen, who lost both legs in World War I; Wing Commander Lionel Cohen, who won the D.F.C. at the age of 68 in 1944, after 45 R.A.F. operational flights in World War II; Colonel Louis Gluckstein; Lieut. Leonard Veyzor, V.C.; Lieut. Colonel J. H. Levey; Major Edmund de Rothschild.

* But not always. In 1290 Edward I, in another economic crisis, expelled England's Jews. In 1644, Roger Williams, himself a conscientious refugee, wrote in favor of their official return. Over the years, beginning about 1650, Jews began re-establishing themselves in Britain. By 1871 Britain's Jews, after many gains, had received complete civil equality.

http://content.time.com/time/magazine/article/0,9171,853177,00.html

Henry died Q4 1953 in Northampton Registration District aged 77.

Medal Card

Name.

Corps.

Rank.

Regtl No.

CUMBERPATCH

Northamptonshire Regmt

Private

16299

ditto

Ditto

ditto

 

 

 

Henry James

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Medal.

Roll.

Page.

Remarks.

VICTORY

K/1/101 B3

238

Discharged 27 March 1916

BRITISH

d[itt]o

d[itt]o

 15 STAR

K/1/2B

191

 

 

 

 

 

 

Silver War Badge List K/236

 

 

Theatre of War first served in

  1. France

 

Date of entry therein

16 June 1915

 

 

 

 

K1380

 

 

Correspondence

Address

 

Silver War Badge

ROLL OF INDIVIDUALS entitled to the “WAR BADGE”

11 Dec 1916 K/236 War Office

Regtl. No.

Rank

Name

Unit

No. of Badge

Enlistment

Discharge

Cause of Discharge

Whether served Overseas

16299

Private

Cumberpatch, H. J.

Northampton

100,052

9 Nov 1914

27 Mar 1916

Para 392 (XVI) Sickness

Yes